Literary analysis essay on to kill a mockingbird - coral-star.ru

To Kill a Mockingbird Literary Analysis Paper. - Duke of Definition

He doesn't retaliate when Bob Ewell spits in his face because he understands that he has wounded Ewell's pride the only real possession this man has. Atticus accepts these people because he is an expert at "climbing into other people's skin and walking around in it.".

Toward the end of the novel, Scout realizes that submitting Boo to a trial would be akin to shooting a mockingbirdjust as the prejudice against African Americans influences the trial of Tom Robinson, the town's prejudices against the white but mentally disabled Boo would likely impact a jury's view. Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, to Kill a Mockingbird has remained enormously popular since its publication in 1960. Recalling her experiences as a six-year-old from an adult perspective, Jean Louise Finch, nicknamed Scout, describes the circumstances involving her widowed father, Atticus, and his legal defense of Tom Robinson, a local black man falsely accused of raping a white woman. Throughout the majority of the novel, Atticus retains his faith in the system, but he ultimately loses in his legal defense of Tom. As a result of this experience, Atticus expresses a certain disillusionment when, at the conclusion of the book, he agrees to conceal Boo's culpability in the killing of Ewell, recognizing that Boo would be stereotyped by his.

Scout and Jem begin to discover mysterious objects, designed to intrigue children, hidden in a tree on the Radley property. When Tom Robinson, an African-American man, is accused of raping Mayella Ewell, Atticus is appointed as the defense attorney. Later, Tom is shot to death during an attempt to escape from jail. The following fall, Bob Ewell, incensed by Atticus's treatment of him during the trial, attacks Scout and Jem with a knife as they are walking home from a school Halloween pageant.

Atticus is clearly the hero of the novel, and functions as a role model for his children. E. The mockingbird represents victims of oppression in general, and the African-American community more specifically. The unjust trial of Tom Robinson, in which the jury's racial prejudice condemns an innocent man, is symbolically characterized as the shooting of an innocent mockingbird.